ENGL311 ALL DISCUSSIONS - 2018

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Dated: 19th Dec'18 09:02 PM
Bounty offered: $160.00

Week 1, Discussion 1: Dryden and St. Cecilia

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For this discussion, read the two odes by Dryden found in the Learning Resources for Week One: "A Song for St. Cecilia's Day" and "Alexander's Feast; or the Power of Musique. An Ode, in Honour of St. Cecilia's Day." You should also read through the other supporting materials that can help you with your analysis.

You will be comparing and contrasting the two poems. First, post the thesis (main idea) of each poem, as you understand it to be. Then discuss one item you find similar (other than each poem's being written in honor of St. Cecilia's day) in the poems and one item you find dissimilar. Look not only at each poem's subject matter, but consider also each one's structure and use of poetic devices as mentioned in Module One's Commentary, such as the use of rhyme, meter, caesura, etc.

If you are not familiar with analyzing poetry at this level, you could consider Dryden's use of imagery or symbolism. The operative word in the previous sentence is the conjunction "or." You should not attempt both because your response should be only three to four hundred words.

As you work through the items in the two poems, try to come to some sort of conclusion about them. Look for an "ah ha" moment in your exploration: that moment when you have broken down the barriers of the poem's complex language and stylistic format and have received an insight into the poems.

Keep focused on one item in each poem as much as possible; for example, if you are writing about the imagery in one, write about imagery in the other. Don't expect to cover everything in these very complex poems. Your fellow students will also be writing on the poems, and by the end of the discussion we probably will cover everything! Also keep in mind that there is no right or wrong answer here. You want to spend some time on and take the opportunity of digging into Dryden's complex poetic style so that you become comfortable with it. It is very important that you first do the summary and narrowing of the poem's thesis.

Post your response by Wednesday. While responses are not required to other students' postings, you may want to respond to help your understanding of the poems. The discussion will allow us a thorough exploration into the two poems and the nature of Restoration poetry.

You must post first before you see any other postings.

Initial discussion posts are due by Wednesday at 11:30 PM ET. You are not required to but are welcome to respond to other postings. You will also be working in Discussion 2 this week.

Week 1, Discussion 2: The Art of the Question

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The art of the question can help you build stronger connections with the material you're studying and help you learn how to facilitate a discussion as well.

This discussion should be completed after you post to Discussion 1.

POSTING: Pick a quotation from one of the odes that you feel you understand. It could be a specific statement or it could be one that makes a more general statement about a topic or theme of the odes. Consider the impact of your choice: longer quotations may have less of an impact.

Post the quotation. Then post a question about the quotation. You can be as specific with your question as you need to be. Think about how your question will help to widen or deepen the understanding of the lines--and even the poem.

Be sure to choose a quotation you understand because you will be responding to classmates' posted answers.

ANSWERS: You are required to answer at least one question posed by your classmates. When choosing the question, try to pick one that no one else has responded to. That way, all questions will be answered.

Please note that the intention here is not to have your instructor answer your question; your classmates should answer it. It will be very important, then, that you phrase your question in a clear manner. The intention of this discussion is to further the class members' understanding of the poems by responding to your question. The instructor will clarify or re-direct responses as needed.

You are also responsible to respond to the answers your question receives so that you can either clarify, acknowledge, or synthesize for the classmates who have responded.

You must post first before you see any other postings.

You should post your question by Friday at 11:30 pm ET and respond by Sunday at 11:30 pm ET. Be prepared to provide any needed feedback or comments to your posting.


Week Two Discussion

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Week 2, Discussion 1: Restoration Prose

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Restoration Prose: Critical Views. The self-consciousness of a "new species of writing"

This week you will be considering selected prose from different time periods in the eighteenth century. You will also be reading material from different subject areas, such as philosophy and science.

While the subject matter is of importance, you will also want to take note on how the writers are using the English language: Is it plain? Is it simple? Do they use metaphor? If so, where? Can you understand what is being said? Is it difficult? If so, why?

You may also want to note the period of time when each piece was written. By the time you reach the Spectator essays (written at the end of the eighteenth century), what has happened to the structure of the language? Note that the three chosen Spectator essays present ideas on philosophy, literature, and science. Is there a difference between how Addison presents these ideas and the way that Dryden, Locke and Newton present their philosophical, literary, and scientific ideas?

In your post, address one of the following writers: Dryden, Newton, and Locke. You must also address Addison. You may use the questions posed above as starting points for your analysis, but you can also come up with your own insights. While you are posting comments for one writer chosen from Dryden, Newton, or Locke, you mustpost your findings for the Addison essay because you will be looking at both ends of the spectrum for prose. For example, you might choose Dryden and Newton, and then look at the Spectator essays that focus on literary criticism and an aspect of science.

As Addison notes, "There is nothing in nature so irksome as general discourses, especially when they turn chiefly upon words." We must therefore be specific in our analyses of the prose of this period as we will be discoursing "chiefly upon words."

You must post first before you see any other postings.

Initial discussion posts are due by Wednesday at 11:30 PM ET. You are not required to but are welcome to respond to other postings. You will also be working in Discussion 2 this week.

Week 2, Discussion 2: The Art of the Word

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After completing Discussion 1, reflect on what you have learned about the English language during this period. Brainstorm some ideas and consider what you learned from the readings and participating in Discussion 1 for this week. Jot down those ideas.

POSTING: After brainstorming, choose a single word that best expresses your view on the language of this period.

Post only the word. Yes, only the word.

However, be prepared to defend/explain it. You will have to respond to any questions or comments you receive on it.

RESPONSE: Respond to at least two other words and note whether you agree or disagree, and why. Also be prepared to keep track of who is responding to your word--and providing any necessary feedback to those comments.

Try to respond to a word that has not received any comments.

You must post first before you see any other postings.

You should post your word by Friday at 11:30 pm ET and respond to at least two other words and any comments made to your posting by Sunday at 11:30 pm ET.


Week Three Discussion

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Week 3, Discussion 1: The Rover

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Restoration Drama: The Rover

This week, you will be exploring how Aphra Behn's play moves beyond even the traditional comedy of manners for the Restoration period. As she notes in the Epilogue, there is something of the devil here, but it pleaseth the nation. What is it?

To find an answer, or at least some insights, let's focus on three characters: Hellena, Angellica, and Willmore. But also focus on a third category "The Other" to represent all the other characters in the play as you may have insights into what they're doing in the play.

As you work through the characters, it may be helpful to consider the following areas: (1) carnival as a setting and why Behn uses it, (2) the representation of the two sexes, and what we learn about the balance of power, and (3) the use of wit and humor, and how it affects the comedic development of the play. Think about Behn's creative use of these three features to present a play that was widely acclaimed--but also widely disparaged.

Please post your finding on at least one of the characters. It will be helpful if you change the subject matter of the line to reflect the character you have chosen.

Be specific in your posting--you want to provide analysis that refers to particular scenes and/or dialogue in the play.

You also will be working with this play in Discussion 2.

You must post first before you see any other postings.

Initial discussion posts are due by Wednesday at 11:30 PM ET. You are not required to but are welcome to respond to other postings. You will also be working in Discussion 2 this week.

Week 3, Discussion 2. The Art of the Title

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A title can speak volumes about a written work, from the title of a literary work to the title of a paper.

In this discussion, you will be considering the arc of a title, i.e., how it sets up the expectations for the upcoming piece of writing. While we will be working with the title of a literary work, the underlying concept can be applied to your own written works and papers.

POSTING: For the discussion, look at the title of Behn's play, every single word of it. Do some research on the meaning of the words, especially the contextual/historical meaning of each word, such as the word rover.

You will want to understand each word and how each word represents the overall story/arc of the play.

After completing the reading of the play and Discussion 1, you should have an overview of the play. Consider whether the title accurately reflects the idea of the play. In your posting present a summary of the research you did and how you agree or disagree with the title.

Whether or not you agree or disagree with the title, propose an alternative title. Be sure it reflects what you view as the idea of the complete play and its idea(s).

Take what you have learned from this discussion and apply it to your papers for this class and any other class.

RESPONSE: Respond to at least two other titles and provide solid feedback as to why the title works or does not work. Respond to those who have responded to your title.

You must post first before you see any other postings.

You should post your title by Friday at 11:30 pm ET and respond to at least two other postings by Sunday at 11:30 pm ET.


Week Four Discussion

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Week 4, Discussion 1: Satire versus Wit: The Dueling Quills

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Satire versus Wit: Dueling Quills

For this week's discussion, consider the following questions:

  • Who expresses the stronger wit here about the virtues and vices of the opposite sex: the men or the women?
  • Who has the upper hand in this debate: the males or the females?

For your response, choose one of the poems and offer it as the strongest answer—and explain why. In your response, you will certainly have to discuss the ideas, but also look at how the ideas are expressed. Importantly, you will want to distinguish the use of satire and how that is achieved through the language itself. To round out your discussion, you will also have to bring in discussions of at least one other of the poems. For example, it is very difficult to discuss Montagu's poem without referring to Swift's.

You can get very specific here. When we read Pope, for example, we have to acknowledge his mastery over the heroic couplet And expression in iambic pentameter. No one, not even Dryden, comes close to his control of the "round numbers." If the other poets do not match up to Pope's poetic control, does it lessen the effectiveness of their satire? Why or why not?

Your discussion does not have to be limited to these questions; please raise your own--as long as you provide us with the answers! Please make sure that your responses include direct references to the poem and that you are providing correct in-text references to the line number(s) of the poem.

You must post first before you see any other postings.

Initial discussion posts are due by Wednesday at 11:30 PM ET. You are not required to but are welcome to respond to other postings. You will also be working in Discussion 2 this week.

Week 4, Discussion 2: The Art of the Persona

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We met several writers with very different viewpoints in Discussion 1, where you focused on the ideas expressed in their writings.

POSTING: To continue the conversation that the poets had in Discussion 1, imagine that you can invite one of them to dinner. Ask that poet one specific question about his or her work.

RESPONSE: You will be required to respond to at least one question posted by a classmate. As part of this response, you will have to take on the persona of the poet being questioned. Based on your knowledge of the poet (be sure to review the biographies) and the particular poem being addressed, provide a response. As nearly as possible, keep to what you consider the character. Respond also to those who respond to your question.

Then, provide a brief paragraph stating what you are taking away from this exercise--in postings of both your question and your answer to someone else's. For example, did the role playing help you to get inside the poet's head a bit more concretely--or not? Were you able to distinguish between the "speaker" of the poem and the poet himself/herself?

You must post first before you see any other postings.

You should post your questions by Friday at 11:30 pm ET and respond by Sunday at 11:30 pm ET.


Week Five Discussion

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Week 5, Discussion 1: The Future of Satire: Swift and Gulliver's Travels

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The Future of Satire: Swift and Gulliver's Travels

As you're reading Gulliver’s Travels, take notes on anything that pops up with respect to the historical, the allegorical/satirical, and/or the literary readings of the text.

In your posting, focus on one of the three passages in particular from Parts I, II, and III provided below. Look them over and analyze them for Swift's use of the historical, the allegorical/satirical, and/or the literary techniques.

You are required to post a section of your own choosing from Part IV; choose a passage that strikes you from one of the standpoints of how Swift uses historical references, allegorical/satirical, and/or literary techniques. Let us know where the passage is (page number(s), beginning and ending paragraphs--as I do below) and analyze how and what Swift is doing there using the criteria above. You want to explain to your reader why the passage is noteworthy.

It may be helpful to do complete this assignment before you look at other people's postings, especially when choosing your own passage from Part IV. If you post and find someone else has chosen the same passage, that's okay. We’re compiling a selection of passages and analysis.

Passages to consider. You must respond in depth to at least one passage from Parts I, II, OR III. You must respond to Part IV in depth to justify your choice of passage.

HINT: Use the CRTL F search feature on your keyboard to locate the start of the passages noted below.

CHOICE 1: Part I. Focus on this passage: Begin with "One morning, about a fortnight," and read to the end of Chapter IV.

CHOICE 2: Part II. Focus on this passage: Begin with "Imagine with thyself," and read to the end of Chapter VII.

CHOICE 3: Part III. Focus on this passage: Begin with "The gentleman to whom," and read to the end of Part III.

REQUIRED PASSAGE: Part IV: A passage of your choice from Part IV. Be sure to note the opening and closing lines of the passage so we can locate it easily.

You must post first before you see any other postings.

Initial discussion posts are due by Wednesday at 11:30 PM ET. You are not required to but are welcome to respond to other postings. You will also be working in Discussion 2 this week.

Week 5, Discussion 2: The Art of Satire

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After you complete Discussion 1, you will want to consider the art of satire itself and how it is an enduring legacy of literature.

Be sure to review the background materials on satire. Then consider how satire is used in our contemporary society.

Gulliver's Travels has frequently been been cited as a misanthropic and misogynistic writing. The views of the character of Gulliver have often been presumed to be the views of Swift, causing Swift to be labeled as misanthropic or misogynistic.

To work beyond the "voice" of Gulliver, we have to dig more deeply into what the satire intends for us to think about.

POSTING: In this posting, you want to consider the art of satire and its effect on us. In this posting, note which scene from Gulliver's Travels bothered you the most.

Then do a short analysis of the scene. Note the characters and action. As you work through this analysis, try to isolate the exact reason it bothers you.

In your posting, present the reason it bothers and the analysis you went through to get to the reason. It will be very important for you to summarize the action and to state the intent of the action.

RESPONSE: Review the other postings and let us know which ones you agree with--or don't agree. Be sure to note why.

You will not be able to see any other postings until you post.

You should post by Friday at 11:30 pm ET and respond to at least two other postings by Sunday at 11:30 pm ET.


Week Six Discussion

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Week 6, Discussion 1: The Eighteenth-Century Novel: Joseph Andrews

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The Eighteenth-Century Novel: Joseph Andrews

Because we are working with such a seminal piece of literature, you will be applying Watts' definition of formal realism to Joseph Andrews, as well as considering how Fielding helped to shape the literary concepts of character, plot, and setting to create plausibility in the genre of the novel.

Create your own thread. Keep responding to it (or editing) as necessary throughout the week to add your ongoing observations of the novel. You are not required to complete this work at one time. In fact, you should consider posting throughout the week so that you can keep your observations ongoing.

The questions and comments below are meant to generate discussion and not to limit it. Please feel free to bring in your own topics and/or questions.

If you need to review definitions of the following literary terms, please locate them in the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Termsfound in the databases of the UMUC Library.

As much as possible post and check back as frequently as you can so that a discussion can be developed.

You need to comment on all of the following areas:

Characters

In this thread, discuss how Fielding develops characters in the novel. As you go through the novel, write down your insights into or about the characters.

Choose one character to discuss, but you should tie the character to the development of an idea. For example, using a specific character, explain how the character can represent such issues as male versus female characters, upper versus lower classes, the development of the arc of the character, the plausibility of characters, the use of names and/or dialogue, etc. You can consider the narrator in the novel as a character. Be sure to discuss the character from start to finish, i.e., if you choose Joseph Andrews, you have to discuss him throughout the entire novel, not just the first chapters.

Let’s see if we can determine some sort of working view towards Fielding's use of characters.

Plot

Discuss Fielding's use of plot in the novel. For example, you could discuss whether the plot is plausible, or not.

You may have to bring in some discussion of character, for the plot cannot move forward without the characters also moving forward. Be sure to discuss the entirety of the novel.

Setting

Focus on Fielding's use of setting in the novel.

Watt notes that it was extremely important for the novel to reflect the contemporary scene of the novelist and the reader.

How does Fielding use the setting to make his novel more plausible to the reader? Are there any places where the novel may be hindered by the setting?

Initial discussion posts are due by Wednesday at 11:30PM ET. You are not required to but are welcome to respond to other postings. You will also be working in Discussion 2 this week.

Week 6, Discussion 2: The Art of Synthesis

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In writing, we often synthesize ideas. Synthesis can provide an extremely powerful way to bring together ideas of other people in order to put forward our own understanding or our own idea of something.

POSTING: In this discussion, you will look for ways to connect the ideas of postings by two of your classmates in Discussion 1 of this week. You will want to look for more than the obvious, i.e., that two postings agree on the same idea. You can use postings from two different topics, such as one from character and one from plot.

For example, consider whether two postings demonstrate X about something and, when read together, they build a stronger understanding about X. Or perhaps they disagree with each other in a way that leads to further questions about the underlying material or a better understanding of the material. Part of your thinking here will be reviewing and synthesizing others' ideas to support your own observations(s). You should refer to the author of the postings by name.

RESPONSE: Respond to at least one other posting. If you see your posting being used, be prepared to comment accordingly, i.e., add to the connection, disagree, etc. Your continuing dialogue with the topic will only help to further it.

You will not be able to see any other postings until you post.

You should post your synthesis by Friday at 11:30 pm ET. By Sunday, 11:30 pm ET, respond to one other synthesis. Be prepared to provided any needed comment or feedback to your posting.


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Week 7, Discussion 1: The Rambler and Things of that Nature

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Samuel Johnson: The Rambler and Things of that Nature

In this discussion you will be working with the literary works of Samuel Johnson. You should read all the selections (especially since you are working with all the readings in Discussions 1 and 2). Choose two of the topics below and post your response using appropriate references to the literary works you're discussing.

Topic 1: Johnson and English Prose

The section “Nonfiction Prose: Samuel Johnson” in The Age of Sensibility Module provides some excellent introductory material on Johnson's prose. Keep in mind when you're reading his prose that he has carried over Dryden's concern with stability in politics being represented by stability in language. Johnson was wary of some of the changes happening in the English language: style-wise, grammar-wise, and genre-wise. He advocated an English style that was controlled and measured and sonorous. You will note the harmony and order in Johnson's sentences, notably the omnipresent use of parallel structure. In his prose, Johnson relies heavily on direct, unelaborate expression. You will not see the metaphors or flowery expressions of an earlier era. Visit The Samuel Johnson Sound Bite Page: Sampler (http://www.samueljohnson.com/popular.html) for a foray into his famous quotations. But be careful: it's easy to get lost, so be sure to come back. Note that oftentimes links are provided to words as defined in his dictionary.

In general, Johnson's prose will contain the following elements of stylistic writing:

  • Majestic vocabulary
  • Balance and antithesis
  • Periodic sentence: a sentence whose idea is not complete until the very end
  • Parallel structures
  • Dependent clauses placed before the independent clause

His prose will also contain a moralistic and sometimes almost disconsolate view towards life that is often tinged with sardonic humor and satire. Oftentimes he directed his sarcasm at himself in a self-deprecating manner—but always with the intent to educate the reader.

After reading "Rambler 5" and "Rambler 31" to introduce yourself to Johnson's prose writing style, consider the following thoughts:

  • What types of stylistic elements can you identify in his prose?
  • How do these elements help or hinder the expression of his ideas?
  • How has the state of English Johnsonian prose evolved from Dyden's time?

Topic 2: Johnson and Literary Criticism

Johnson contributed to the ongoing development of literary criticism in two fashions. The first is through his well-known "Preface to Shakespeare."

The "Preface" is an extremely important writing in what was, in Johnson's time, the relatively new area of Shakespearean criticism. Despite Pope's publication of his own edition of Shakespeare, Shakespeare's plays were falling into critical disrepute among the also relatively new school of English literary criticism, partially due to the influence of the theory of the three unities. As we discussed in our work on Fielding, this literary theory had taken precedence over all other dramatic theories and often gave rise to some of the most structured plays ever written. Shakespeare's plays, often taking place over more than one day and in more than one location, such as Henry V, did not fall under this strict and somewhat oppressive interpretation of Aristotle's theories.

As you read Johnson's "Preface," consider the following thoughts:

  • Do you agree with what he has to say about Shakespeare?
  • What do you think of Johnson's redemption of the Bard of Avon?
  • What does he contribute to the foundation of Shakespearean criticism?

Topic 3: Johnson and Biographical Criticism

The other area of literary criticism that Johnson helped to establish is the genre of literary biography: studying the lives of poets and writers to understand what they wrote and why they wrote it. Of course, this began the branch of literary criticism we know today as biographical criticism. Johnson, a man of no easy opinions, lays the groundwork for this criticism, but he also includes so much of his opinion that oftentimes the underlying life of the poet is taken over. Yet, it is still worth reading today for the mix of his insights about the nature of literature and the human beings who wrote it and read it. He interweaves biography and criticism so that each illuminates and strengthens the other.

In addition, Johnson himself is the subject of a literary biography by James Boswell, who compulsively recorded Johnson's life, deeds, and witticisms. Boswell's very famous The Life of Samuel Johnson provides astounding insight not only into Johnson, but the very nature of late eighteenth-century life. Boswell, too, will coalesce the anecdotes with the criticism in his remarkable relation of the life of this literary genius.

For this section, you'll also be reading “Rambler 60,” "Preface to Shakespeare,” and from "The Life of Pope." As you read through these selections, here are some questions to consider:

  • What does Johnson have to say about Pope and his poetry that resonates with your study of the poet?
  • What elements does Johnson contribute to the genre of biographical criticism?

Topic 4: Johnson and the English Language

For this section, you will be considering Johnson's momentous task of writing his Dictionary of the English Language. He became known to many of his contemporaries as "Dictionary Johnson." Therein he studies the nature of words, how they stand alone, and how they work with each other. Whilst not the first English dictionary, Johnson's is the one that set the precedent for future lexicographers, notably in providing the etymology of words and samples from literature to distinguish the use of words. His linguistic explanations are often based on a Latin grammar, so you can see the beginnings of one our modern explanations of theories of grammar, known as prescriptive grammar, the art of speaking and writing correctly. Again, you may find the definitions heavily opinionated for modern tastes, but the definitions can offer distinctive breakthroughs in grasping the myriad nuances of the English language. His dictionary would influence the format of The Oxford English Dictionary (minus the opinions).

After reading “The Preface to a Dictionary of the English Language” and “The Plan of a Dictionary of the English Language,” consider the following thoughts:

  • What do the entries have to say about English today?
  • Can you recognize any elements of lexicography or etymology that still help us with defining and using words today?
  • Does anything Dictionary Johnson says in his “Preface” or his “Plan” seem familiar--or distant to you? Consider, for example, what we find in contemporary dictionaries today, including online dictionaries.

Initial discussion posts are due by Wednesday at 11:30 PM ET. You are not required to but are welcome to respond to other postings. You will also be working in Discussion 2 this week.

Week 7, Discussion 2: The Art of Synthesis (continued)

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As you did in Week 6, you will be practicing the art of synthesis. This practice will also help you in your upcoming paper when you have to bring in multiple sources.

Remember that synthesis can provide an extremely powerful way to bring together ideas of other people in order to put forward our own understanding or our own idea of something.

POSTING: In this discussion, you will look for ways to connect the ideas of postings by two of your classmates in Discussion 1 of this week. You will want to look for more than the obvious, i.e., that two postings agree on the same idea. You should choose postings from a different topic than the one you addressed in Discussion 1. You can, however, bring together ideas from two different topics, such as Johnson's criticism and his contribution to the language.

For example, consider whether two postings demonstrate X about something and when read together, they build a stronger understanding about X. Or perhaps they disagree with each other in a way that leads to further questions about the underlying material or a better understanding of the material. Part of your thinking here will be reviewing and synthesizing other ideas to support your own observations(s). You should refer to the author of the postings by name.

RESPONSE: Respond to at least one other posting. If you see your posting being used, be prepared to comment accordingly, i.e., add to the connection, disagree, etc. Your continuing dialogue with the topic will only help to further it.

You will not be able to see any other postings until you post.

You should post your synthesis by Friday at 11:30 pm ET. By Sunday, 11:30 pm ET, respond to one other synthesis. Be prepared to provided any needed comment or feedback to your posting.


Week Eight Discussions

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Week 8, Discussion 1: The Poetry of Sensibility--Tender Feelings in a Dying Age of Reason

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Complete the readings. Then complete the following topics. You will be responding to both parts of the topic.

1. The Commentary for The Age of Sensibility mentions that Johnson's writings bridge the Augustan poets and the poets of Sensibility.

In his poem, look for and discuss at least two elements of Augustan poetry and two elements of Sensibility that demonstrate how his poetry fits into both worlds. The Commentary provides you with several ways to distinguish the elements of Augustan poetry from the elements of Sensibility. Be sure to provide phrases or lines from the poetry to support your response.

2. Then, in one of the other poems, look for at least two elements of Sensibility. Also look for elements of poetry that we discussed earlier, such as the heroic couplet, rhyme, classical references, etc. If you determine anything different in these poems from what you found in Johnson’s poem, make some comments about those differences.

You want to end up with a commentary on how Johnson's poem and one other poem reflect the tension between the Augustan Age and the now "modern" age of Sensibility. As part of that commentary, you may bring in your own insights and reactions, but I'd like you to use this exercise as to practice explication than for reader-response: you're looking at the poem itself to discern its elements. Be sure to provide phrases or lines from the poetry to support your response.

Please attempt to complete as much of your response as possible without looking at any postings of others so that you can fully develop your analytical and explication skills here.

Initial discussion posts are due by Wednesday at 11:30 PM ET. You are not required to but are welcome to respond to other postings. You will also be working in Discussion 2 this week.

Week 8, Discussion 2: The Art of the Question Redux

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We have come a long way, from the discussion in Week 1. We have met many writers and explored their writings, lives, ideas, and dreams.

To provide a bookend to the course, we will revisit the format of the second discussion in Week 1: the art of the question. However, this is a discussion redux: you now have the literature from the whole course to choose from, and you should feel comfortable explaining the literature of the eighteenth century. In this discussion, you will build on the work you have completed throughout the entire course.

This discussion should be completed after you post to Discussion 1, as you can use the literary works and authors from Week 8 as part of this discussion.

POSTING: Pick a quotation that you feel represents the literature of the eighteenth century. For example, it can be a quotation that helped you understand the main idea of a literary work or a quotation that makes a more general statement about a topic or theme of the period of literature. The quotation can be from any literary work: poetry, prose, drama, the novel. Consider the impact of your choice: longer quotations may have less of an impact.

Post the quotation. Then ask your classmates a question as to why or how the quotation represents the literature of the eighteenth century. You can be specific here if need be.

Be sure you choose a quotation you understand because you will be responding to classmates' posted answers.

ANSWERS: You are required to answer at least one question posed by a classmate. When choosing the question, try to pick one that no one else has responded it. That way, all questions will be answered.

Please note that the intention here is not to have your instructor answer your question; your classmates should do so. It will be very important, then, that you phrase your question in a clear manner. The intention of this discussion is to further the class members' understanding of the literary work. The instructor will clarify or re-direct responses as needed.

You are also responsible to respond to the answers you receive so that you can clarify, acknowledge, or synthesize as need be.

You will not be able to see any other postings until you post.

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ENGL311 ALL DISCUSSIONS - 2018
Answered by debbie
Expert Rating: 190 Ratings
Dated: 19th Dec'18 09:02 PM
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